Posts by Collection

portfolio

publications

Julia Sets that are Full of Holes

Published in Mathematical Intellegencer, 2008

A Julia set is a type of fractal. We will explore the idea of a Julia set which is full of holes, or porous. The idea of porosity will lead to ways to understand the complexity of the sets in terms of whether they take up space, and in terms of dimension.

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Assessing clicker examples versus board examples in Calculus

Published in PRIMUS, 2012

The combination of classroom voting system (clicker) questions and peer instruction has been shown to increase student learning. While implementations in large lectures have been around for a while, mathematics has been increasingly using clickers in classes of a smaller size. In Fall 2008, I conducted an experiment to measure the effect of clickers on exam performance. The experiment was conducted with two sections of Calculus 1, using the same examples either on the board or with clickers. By comparing only the lower-performing students in the sections and alternating use of the clicker between sections, I was able to obtain modestly significant results showing improved exam performance for low-performing students, despite a small sample size.

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Bacterial Community Dynamics in Dichloromethane-Contaminated Groundwater Undergoing Natural Attenuation.

Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, 2017

Joint work with Gina Lamendella and many others

Recommended citation: "Bacterial Community Dynamics in Dichloromethane-Contaminated Groundwater Undergoing Natural Attenuation.", Wright Justin, Kirchner Veronica, Bernard William, Ulrich Nikea, McLimans Christopher, Campa Maria F., Hazen Terry, Macbeth Tamzen, Marabello David, McDermott Jacob, Mackelprang Rachel, Roth Kimberly, Lamendella Regina. Frontiers in Microbiology, Volume 8, 2017. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29213257

talks

Using Plickers in Introductory Statistics

Published:

Abstract: Classroom response systems or clickers are a popular way to get whole class feedback on a question. Used with peer instruction and discussion they can enhance students understanding of the material. However many systems cost both you and the students money. Plickers is a new free option for which the students use no devices to answer the question. Instead it uses pictures based on QR codes. I will discuss the reasons clicker questions are great to use in the introductory statistics classroom and the successes and challenges of doing so with Plickers.

Plickers

Published:

Plickers is a classroom response system that I use in my classroom. Slides(‘http://www.apstatsmonkey.com/StatsMonkey/ReadBestPractice_files/plickersAPReading.pdf’)

Reviewing Prerequisite Material for a Course: How and When Should It Be Done?

Published:

Joint work and talk with Henry Escuadro. Abstract: When teaching a course with a prerequisite, we sometimes find that many students are underprepared on the prerequisite material needed. Whether we do a formal review or not is dependent on many factors. But if we are going to review the prerequisite material for the course we are teaching, two relevant questions that we should ask are how and when. In AY 2016, Henry Escuadro and Kim Roth worked on a project that they hoped would answer these questions in the context of Calculus 1. The standard prerequisite for Calculus 1 is Precalculus. Though Precalculus is offered at Juniata, many students taking Calculus 1 encounter the prerequisite materials in high school. However, due to various reasons, we find that many students come underprepared on precalculus material and doing a review of precalculus benefits a group of these students. Members of the Math Department do reviews two different ways — the first method is done at the beginning of the semester while the second method is done throughout the semester. This project was done to determine whether there was a difference in effectiveness between the two methods.

Comparisons

Published:

Stop comparing your outsides to other people’s insides. Illustrated with personal experiences.

Introducing R to Different Statistical Audiences.

Published:

Abstract:This semester all three of my classes, Introduction to Probability and Statistics, Introduction to Data Science, and Statistical Consulting are using R. Each class has many students who have never used R and have a few who have. I will discuss the implementations that I used in each class and what the advantages and challenges of each implementation were. Options such as using an Rstudio server and different graphing tools will be discussed.

Introduction to Data Science with No Prerequisites

Published:

With Loren Rhodes. Abstract: Introduction to Data Science is often offered as a course with prerequisites varying from an introductory statistics course to a first course in programming. Juniata College offers Introduction to Data Science as a class with no prerequisites that is intended for first year students. The course is part of the minor in Data Science. It is team taught by a statistician and a computer scientist and uses R and Weka as computing tools. This poster will talk about the course and its content along with successes and challenges in offering the course.

Classroom Response Systems and Peer Instruction: Two Literature Reviews and a Demo

Published:

Abstract: Classroom Response Systems also known as clickers have been used as an active learning technique together with peer instruction to increase student participation and understanding. I will discuss some study results from two recent literature reviews, one on each topic. Also I will demonstrate the free system of clickers, plickers, that I currently use.

A Mathematician Knits an Afghan

Published:

Abstract: While knitting a Hue Shift afghan, I began to wonder, how many possible afghans of this type are there? This led to more questions. What makes an afghan a Hue Shift? What should we count and how? These questions will be answered and other questions will be asked.

Seeing the Forest for the Trees: Random Forests and Predicting Fracking

Published:

When you have thousands of variables that you can select from to describe and predict whether active fracking is occurring, how do you choose? Random forests are a learning method that uses an ensemble of decision trees to build a predictive model. We’ll discuss how to make a random forest and how we used one to tell what measures from the microbiome and the sample site best predicted active fracking status.

Seeing the Forest for the Trees: Random Forests and Predicting Fracking

Published:

When you have thousands of variables that you can select from to describe and predict whether active fracking is occurring, how do you choose? Random forests are a learning method that uses an ensemble of decision trees to build a predictive model. We’ll discuss how to make a random forest and how we used one to tell what measures from the microbiome and the sample site best predicted active fracking status.

teaching

Courses Taught at WJU

Courses taught, Wheeling Jesuit University, now Wheeling University, 2006

From Fall 2002-Fall 2005 Taught Math in Society, Precalculus, Calculus I, Calculus II, Calculus III, Discrete Math, Linear Algebra, Introduction to Research Seminar, Introduction to Real Variables, Freshman Year Seminar, and Sophomore Honors Seminar.

Courses Taught at Juniata

Undergraduate courses, Juniata College, 2019

From Fall 2006- present. Taught Quantitative Methods, Introduction to Data Science, Linear Algebra, Calculus I, Calculus II, Calculus III, Introduction to Probability and Statistics, Statistical Consulting, Numerical Analysis, Probability, Probability and Statistics, Multivariate Statistics, Chaos and Fractals, Differential Equations, Bayesian Statistics and Mathematics Research. Co-developed Juniata’s program in Data Science.